Earth and Ashes Rahimi
2004 Shortlist

Earth and Ashes

artwork-image

ABOUT
THE BOOK

Earth and Ashes, set during the Russian occupation of Afghanistan, is a fable about war, family, home and tradition. And old man and his grandson sit in a deserted landscape of dusty roads and looming mountains. What are they waiting for? As we watch them, we learn their story. In one short day they have witnessed all the horrors of war: a Russian bomb, a village in flames, the death of everyone they love. Now the old man must carry the news to the coal mine where the boy’s father works. Yet his arrival there will spell further tragedy when he is led to believe that his son has betrayed codes of honour that lie deep in the Afghan soul.
Rahimi has managed to condense centuries of Afghan history into this short tale of three very different generations. At the same time, he has created a story that is universal in its power. Bleak though his message is, the extraordinary beauty of his prose and the clarity of his vision offer hope and redemption.

ABOUT
THE AUTHOR Atiq
Rahimi

Atiq Rahimi was born in Afghanistan in 1962, but fled to France in 1984.  There he has become renowned as a maker of documentary and feature films, and as a writer.  The film of Earth and Ashes was in the Official Selection at Cannes in 2004 and won a number of prizes. He is currently adapting A Thousand Rooms of Dreams and Fear for the screen.  Since 2001 Rahimi has returned to Afghanistan a number of times to set up a Writers’ House in Kabul and offer support and training to young Afghan writers and film-makers. He lives in Paris.

Atiq Rahimi was born in Afghanistan in 1962, but fled to France in 1984.  There he has become renowned as a maker of documentary and feature films, and as a writer.  The film of Earth and Ashes was in the Official Selection at Cannes in 2004 and won a number of prizes. He is currently adapting A Thousand Rooms of Dreams and Fear for the screen.  Since 2001 Rahimi has returned to Afghanistan a number of times to set up a Writers’ House in Kabul and offer support and training to young Afghan writers and film-makers. He lives in Paris.

ABOUT
THE TRANSLATOR Erdag
M. Göknar

Erdağ Göknar is a Turkish-American scholar, literary translator and poet. He is Associate Professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University and Director of the Duke University Middle East Studies Center.

Göknar is best known for his award-winning translation of Orhan Pamuk’s Ottoman historical novel, My Name is Red (Knopf 2001; Everyman’s Library 2010), which marked Pamuk’s emergence as an author of world literature, contributing to his selection as Nobel laureate in 2006. John Updike commented on the translation in The New Yorker: “Translating from the Turkish, a non-Indo-European language with a grammar that puts the verb at the end of even the longest sentence, isn’t a task for everybody; Erdağ Göknar deserves praise for the cool, smooth English in which he has rendered Pamuk’s finespun sentences, passionate art appreciations, slyly pedantic debates, eerie urban scenes … and exhaustive inventories.” The best-selling novel was awarded the 2003 International Dublin Literary Award, a 100,000 Euro prize that acknowledges both translator and author, and was reissued as part of the Everyman’s Library Contemporary Classics in 2010.

Göknar’s translation of Atiq Rahimi’s Earth and Ashes (Harcourt) from Dari was shortlisted for the IMPAC Literary Award in 2004 and reissued by Other Press in 2010. In 2008 Göknar translated modernist Turkish author Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar’s iconic novel of Istanbul A Mind at Peace (Archipelago, 2008/2011), which was awarded a translation grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The translation was presented to President Barack Obama by the Turkish government during a state visit in 2009.

Göknar’s critical articles have appeared in journals such as South Atlantic QuarterlyNovel: A Forum on Fiction, and the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies.

In 2013, Göknar published a work of literary and cultural criticism entitled Orhan Pamuk, Secularism and Blasphemy: The Politics of the Turkish Novel (Routledge), which argues that productive tension between literary tropes of din (Turkish Islam) and devlet (state secularism) informs Pamuk’s work and marks its currency as world literature.

His collection of poetry, Nomadologies (Turtle Point Press), appeared in 2017 and is a poetics of Turkish-American diaspora, addressing themes of cultural dislocation.

Göknar is the recipient of two Fulbright Fellowship awards.

Erdağ Göknar is a Turkish-American scholar, literary translator and poet. He is Associate Professor of Turkish and Middle Eastern Studies at Duke University and Director of the Duke University Middle East Studies Center.

Göknar is best known for his award-winning translation of Orhan Pamuk’s Ottoman historical novel, My Name is Red (Knopf 2001; Everyman’s Library 2010), which marked Pamuk’s emergence as an author of world literature, contributing to his selection as Nobel laureate in 2006. John Updike commented on the translation in The New Yorker: “Translating from the Turkish, a non-Indo-European language with a grammar that puts the verb at the end of even the longest sentence, isn’t a task for everybody; Erdağ Göknar deserves praise for the cool, smooth English in which he has rendered Pamuk’s finespun sentences, passionate art appreciations, slyly pedantic debates, eerie urban scenes … and exhaustive inventories.” The best-selling novel was awarded the 2003 International Dublin Literary Award, a 100,000 Euro prize that acknowledges both translator and author, and was reissued as part of the Everyman’s Library Contemporary Classics in 2010.

Göknar’s translation of Atiq Rahimi’s Earth and Ashes (Harcourt) from Dari was shortlisted for the IMPAC Literary Award in 2004 and reissued by Other Press in 2010. In 2008 Göknar translated modernist Turkish author Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar’s iconic novel of Istanbul A Mind at Peace (Archipelago, 2008/2011), which was awarded a translation grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The translation was presented to President Barack Obama by the Turkish government during a state visit in 2009.

Göknar’s critical articles have appeared in journals such as South Atlantic QuarterlyNovel: A Forum on Fiction, and the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies.

In 2013, Göknar published a work of literary and cultural criticism entitled Orhan Pamuk, Secularism and Blasphemy: The Politics of the Turkish Novel (Routledge), which argues that productive tension between literary tropes of din (Turkish Islam) and devlet (state secularism) informs Pamuk’s work and marks its currency as world literature.

His collection of poetry, Nomadologies (Turtle Point Press), appeared in 2017 and is a poetics of Turkish-American diaspora, addressing themes of cultural dislocation.

Göknar is the recipient of two Fulbright Fellowship awards.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Date published
03/10/2002
Country
Afghanistan, France
Original Language
Dari
Author
Publisher
Chatto and Windus
Translator
Erdag M. Göknar

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